15 comments on “Britain’s refusal to give sanctuary to refugees is tantamount to murder

  1. John Grimshaw on said:

    In reply Jesus said: “A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, when he was attacked by robbers. They stripped him of his clothes, beat him and went away, leaving him half dead. 31 A priest happened to be going down the same road, and when he saw the man, he passed by on the other side. 32 So too, a Levite, when he came to the place and saw him, passed by on the other side. 33 But a Samaritan, as he traveled, came where the man was; and when he saw him, he took pity on him. 34 He went to him and bandaged his wounds, pouring on oil and wine. Then he put the man on his own donkey, brought him to an inn and took care of him. 35 The next day he took out two denarii[c] and gave them to the innkeeper. ‘Look after him,’ he said, ‘and when I return, I will reimburse you for any extra expense you may have.’

    36 “Which of these three do you think was a neighbor to the man who fell into the hands of robbers?”

    37 The expert in the law replied, “The one who had mercy on him.”

    Jesus told him, “Go and do likewise.”

  2. Even sections of the Tory press are calling for Britain to take in more refugees, with the exception, I gather, of the Daily Mail. Consistent there, it wasn’t keen on German Jewish children in the c.1938. Still, I wouldn’t imagine Teresa May and co. will be swayed by any amount of human tragedy.

  3. John Grimshaw

    Not trying to make light of an issue that has brought tears to my eyes over the last day or so, but ‘A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, when he was attacked by robbers’, doesn’t sound right to me. ‘Attacked by robbers’ sounds like a story about somebody being mugged at a cash point in the Liverpool Echo. I remember ‘A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, when he was set upon by thieves’.

  4. George Hallam on said:

    Sam64: ‘Attacked by robbers’ sounds like a story about somebody being mugged at a cash point in the Liverpool Echo. I remember ‘A man was going down from Jerusalem to Jericho, when he was set upon by thieves’.

    If you’re going to be a pedant then don’t rely on your memory. It’s not reliable enough.

    In this case, “fell among thieves” is what the KJV says. Most modern translations use the term ‘robber’.

    Personally, I really need to pay more attention Proverbs 26:4

  5. This will possibly go down as one of the most harrowing photographs ever publicised and hopefully will play its part in changing public opinion, or at least spurring on that section of public opinion which already feels the right way about this to make its voice heard louder.

  6. #3 and 4. Robber conveys the parable better than thief. Robbery requires force or the threat thereof. A thief may simply have picked his pocket.

    More relevant to this post is the definition of murder.

    In Scottish law, this requires contemplation that death may result from your actions and for you not to care. In English law, at least that death or serious injury is a ‘moral certainty’.

    So I think we can safely say that the word is entirely appropriate.

  7. Vanya, George

    Why be a pedant when you’re on hand George!

    Fair point about the connotations of robber and thief. You wouldn’t talk about an armed thief would you? I still think the word thief sounds better, somehow more indicative of a moral parable, a hint of mystery and intrigue at the start of the story. But a thug lying in wait to rob somebody – a robber – is a timeless phenomenon. As is compassion. As are hypocrisy, cynicism and xenophobia, the Tory government with Syrian (and other) refugees being only a contemporary instance.

  8. Vanya,

    No but go on, prey tell.

    As it happens, I think of Longsight at the mention of armed robbers, the reason being I used to know a couple of guys who run a off license there in the mid 1990s. They were on the receiving end just to be clear.