Chinese Rap tribute to Karl Marx goes viral in Peoples Republic

By Gao Yinan from (People’s Daily Online)

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A hip-hop song titled “Marx Is a Post-90s,” which was originally written for a television show, has gone viral across Chinese social media. The song was written and produced bypost-80s and post-90s youngsters—China’s millennial generation. Released in March, the song has introduced the late, great icon to a new generation of young people.

A number of netizens have commented that this phenomenon does not seem to fit thestereotype that post-80s and post-90s generations are ideologically pluralistic.Nevertheless, young people tend to have a great spirit for criticism and skepticism, justlike Marx in his youth. Young people’s sense of justice and responsibility, as well as theirdesire for freedom, is reflected in many of Karl Marx’s beliefs.

Some people believe Marxist doctrine is outdated, while others label it as “brainwashing.”However, the song proves that Marx continues to appeal to youth, and will never completely go out of style.

View the video here: http://en.people.cn/n3/2016/0525/c90000-9063036.html

(SU editor: It is shared via the Chinese medium, youKU, if I can work out the Mandarin language menus, I will try to embed it later)

7 comments on “Chinese Rap tribute to Karl Marx goes viral in Peoples Republic

  1. Vanya on said:

    (SU editor: It is shared via the Chinese medium, youKU, if I can work out the Mandarin language menus, I will try to embed it later)

    That would be fairly helpful Andy 🙂

  2. Vanya on said:

    Andy Newman:
    Vanya,

    Well you can watch it by going to the Peoples daily article, for which I have given a link

    I have, but I don’t understand Chinese, Mandarin or otherwise.

    I do however know that imperialism is a paper tiger and have a reasonable understanding of the correct method of handling contradictions among the people.

  3. Andy H on said:

    … have a reasonable understanding of the correct method of handling contradictions among the people.

    Sending those with differing opinions to Siberia for ‘re education’?
    🙂

  4. Back in the day, Siberia would have been a good place to get people reducated in the spirit of Khushchevite revisionism. I’m not sure Mao would have wanted that.