11 comments on “Corbyn shows leadership in Chilcot speech

  1. John on said:

    It was an able response, but let us not overegg the pudding. The Chilcot report and statement this morning from Sir John Chilcot provided an open door.

    Any credit for the events of today belong squarely with Sir John Chilcot and his team. Many of us were expecting something approximating to a whitewash. What we got was a report that goes some way to restoring faith in British parliamentary democracy.

    Blair and the others who were party to the decision to take the country into the most devastating and transparently imperialist war since Vietnam have been delivered a 2.6 million word flogging.

    The question now is what now? This clearly cannot and should not be the end of the matter. Legal proceedings must follow. Corbyn and all right thinking people now must demand nothing less.

  2. jack on said:

    Well, it was sort of OK. I didn’t disagree with anything he said, but to be honest I also got a bit bored about half way through. In terms of honest responses, I think I prefer those of some of the families of dead soldiers in the other video posted here, who talked about Blair being a liar and a terrorist.

    Corbyn really needs to stop trying to be a ‘proper’ politician, and express in a much clearer way the anger that so many people feel against Blair and the rest of the political establishment.

  3. jack: Corbyn really needs to stop trying to be a ‘proper’ politician, and express in a much clearer way the anger that so many people feel against Blair and the rest of the political establishment.

    On the contrary.
    The boy done well.
    Corbyn came to this discussion with incomparable moral authority. Apart from the fact that histrionics is not his style his low key, modest and calm presentation is a good exemplar of the Brechtian principle that rational reflection, including self reflection, functions as a mechanism to change both the material world and the world of perceptions.
    All those soon to be ex-Labour MPs sitting behind him who voted for the war will benefit from this approach. In fact the shamefaced heckling by some of them is an expression of their emotional need to suppress the historical truths that Corbyn calmly catalogued.
    Note how Tom Watson found every opportunity to signify assent with Corbyn.
    In the same way Blair’s artful mea culpa functions to minimise his guilt.
    If parliament is a theatre the Corbyn style works in harmony with the political content of his intervention in a powerful attempt to subvert the catharsis that his opposition suppose will minimise their complicity in the war crimes.
    The justifiable anger of the military families and the Iraqi victims serves as a counterpoint to Corbyn rational pitch.

  4. Andy Newman on said:

    Nick Wright: Corbyn came to this discussion with incomparable moral authority. Apart from the fact that histrionics is not his style his low key, modest and calm presentation is a good exemplar of the Brechtian principle that rational reflection, including self reflection, functions as a mechanism to change both the material world and the world of perceptions.

    I agree entirely.

    Corbyn can only be the man he is, and it would be unreaslistic to expect him to be someone else.

    As a general point, comrades need to consider that Jeremy Corbyn is the actually existing leader of the Labour Party, and what a considerable achievement that is for the left. For those who contemplate what they consider weaknesses of either Corbyn or his team, then consider that “men make history but not in the circumstances of their own choosing”, the opportunity that exists for the left may not be the perfect one, but it is the one that has been presented to us.

    We don’t always get to choose the ground we fight on, but when battle is engaged, then we need to be show self discipline,

  5. Andy Newman on said:

    John: The Chilcot report and statement this morning from Sir John Chilcot provided an open door.

    Do you think Angela Eagle would have done as well? Genuine question.

  6. John on said:

    Andy Newman: Do you think Angela Eagle would have done as well? Genuine question.

    Andy Newman: Do you think Angela Eagle would have done as well? Genuine question.

    No, not at all. Jeremy brought to proceedings his long and virtuous record of opposition to the Iraq War, lending him a moral authority in Parliament yesterday that none of his counterparts had. The standing ovation he received from the military families prior to his speech apologising on behalf of the Labour Party was particularly poignant.

    It would be churlish and wrong to claim otherwise.

  7. Tony on said:

    Yes, Corbyn was very good.

    Blair, by contrast, was unbelievable.

    He decided to revive the thoroughly discredited claim that Saddam Hussein kicked out the weapons inspectors in 1998.
    “In 1998, following the ejection of the weapons inspectors…”
    And later on:
    “The eviction of weapons inspectors in 1998…”

    He had repeatedly used this one before until he was challenged on it in the run-up to the invasion of Iraq in 2003.

    The Washington Post: A December 18, 1998 article by national security correspondent Barton Gellman reported that “Butler ordered his inspectors to evacuate Baghdad, in anticipation of a military attack, on Tuesday night.”

    The attack, Operation Desert Fox, followed on Wednesday 16 December 1998.

  8. Petter Matthews on said:

    Tony,

    I have always thought that Blair was probably psychopathic – lack of remorse, ability to charm, inability to empathise, prone to extreme violence – and his performance this week has only reinforced that view.

  9. Andy Newman,

    Exactly. The attacks on Corbyn, however personal, are fundamentally much bigger than Corbyn himself. They are an attack on democracy and on the left’s inclusion in democracy. This is an attempt to effectively disenfranchise the left.