Labour’s 1929 Election Poster

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I am no fan of David Miliband, but during the Commons debate on the Tory Welfare Reform Bill, he used the example of a Labour Party poster from 1929 to illustrate the mindset of the Tories, both yellow and blue, when it comes to equality and making sacrifices during a recession.

It is a very effective poster, which speaks more powerfully than words, and Labour could do worse than produce an up to date version now.

David Miliband’s speech is worth listening to. He spoke powerfully and landed some telling blows on the Tories and their Lib-Dem bag carriers.

They really are the scum of the Earth.

 

 

 

4 comments on “Labour’s 1929 Election Poster

  1. Chris Watts on said:

    Looking at this picture the Coalition would have you believe that they are supplying an aqualung for the man on the bottom rung but in reality it is barely more than a bendy straw from McDonald’s and make do…

  2. I haven’t listened to David Miliband’s speech but I’ll take John’s word for it that he landed some effective blows on the Tories.

    However, The Guardian reports that his speech was underpinned by an acceptance of the government’s overall spending totals (“I am happy to debate priorities within that envelope”).

    See: http://socialisteconomicbulletin.blogspot.co.uk/2012/12/the-autumn-statement-and-long-term.html

    “If Labour is elected but does not reverse these plans it will be implementing cuts much greater in 2015/16 than the cuts that were implemented in 2011/12. The real effect of the cuts will be more than three times greater.”

  3. Mark: However, The Guardian reports that his speech was underpinned by an acceptance of the government’s overall spending totals (“I am happy to debate priorities within that envelope”).

    Indeed…but unfortunately the Tories in my view have won that argument and Labour have succumbed to it.

    But D Miliband’s description of the reforms as ‘rancid’ has certainly resonated, as has his use of this 1929 election poster to illustrate and highlight the iniquity of the Tory cuts.

    I’m not saying for a second that D Miliband should be seen as a champion of the working class and/or unemployed. Far from it. But he did land a few blows, which is more than the shadow front bench have in recent weeks.

  4. Yes, I understand that, John. Attempting to take the fight to the Tories is much better than trying to outflank them from the right.
    But the sting in the tail here is very painful. If Labour accepts the spending terms set by the Tories it will be taking responsibility for cuts on an extraordinary scale.