31 comments on “Mosley comes a cropper

  1. Jellytot on said:

    Fantastic….not many students waving yellow lollipops there !

    Around this time there was a Jewish group called The 62 Group who really brought it to the fascists.

    They included a lot of war veterans and turned over the original 60’s BNP at the wonderfully named “Battle of the Balls Pond Road”.

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  2. John Grimshaw on said:

    Andy I notice that Mosley’s lot are holding up some kind of National European banner. I’m aware that he constantly changed his mind over a number of things and that he went through a stage of advocating pan-European fascism (if that’s the best way to call it) but is your intention in showing this also to pander to your lexit (largely Stalinist) audience?

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  3. #3 Presumably it’s in the picture because like everything else in the picture it was there 🙂

    Andy could of course used some sort of technological means to remove it or tried to edit it.

    Who was that Russian (or should I say Georgian?) bloke who had a bit of a reputation for doing that sort of thing?

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  4. John Grimshaw,

    The 62 Group was quite a while after the 43 Group but probably shared some personnel. It provided a more physical complement to the more pacifist Yellow Star Movement which was also around at the time. And again, probably quietly shared some personnel.

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  5. Jellytot on said:

    John Grimshaw:
    Is this after the 43 group or are we getting confused?

    It was a successor group to the 43 Group. The 43 Group were active in the late 40’s….the 62 Group in the early 60’s. They were practically identical in terms of their methodology.

    They would be tarred with the slur “Squadist” today by those who want to monopolize anti-fascism but they were effective.

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  6. Jellytot on said:

    John Grimshaw:
    Andy I notice that Mosley’s lot are holding up some kind of National European banner. I’m aware that he constantly changed his mind over a number of things and that he went through a stage of advocating pan-European fascism (if that’s the best way to call it) but is your intention in showing this also to pander to your lexit (largely Stalinist) audience?

    I am sure it never even crossed Andy’s mind but it allowed you to get your dig in.

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  7. Andy Newman on said:

    John Grimshaw: he went through a stage of advocating pan-European fascism

    This was actually a quite consistent policy of Mosley’s, consistent with the pan- European views of other fascists like Leon Degrelle. The BUF opposed WW2 on the platform of pan Europeanism “no more brother wars”.

    Those opposing Mosley in 1962 were unlikely to give a toss about his views on Europe.

    Mostly you point is just silly

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  8. Jellytot on said:

    brianthedog:
    Jellytot,

    John Grimshaw likes to come across as a clever dick with an emphasis on the latter.

    Andy Newman,

    Mosley’s tiny 70’s group, UM/Action Party, run by his long term collaborator Jeffery Hamm, was the only fascist party to campaign for continued membership of the EEC in the 1975 referendum.

    Robert Skidelsky in his Mosley biography pinpoints Mosley’s WW1 experiences as the catalysis for his pan-europanism.

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  9. Andy Newman: “no more brother wars”.

    This slogan used to be the main one for several fascist groups turning up at the Cenotaph on Remembrance Sunday and yet the only one I know of that used to make a big deal of pan-Europeanism was the British Movement.

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  10. John Grimshaw on said:

    EvanP: Who was that Russian (or should I say Georgian?) bloke who had a bit of a reputation for doing that sort of thing?

    I have a postcard indoors of Lenin giving a speech which was given to us by a Russian friend which clearly shows Trotsky standing to one side (don’t know what he was doing) but it is the original of the one that was then famously doctored by Stalin (or his oppos) and then Trotsky disappeared.

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  11. John Grimshaw on said:

    Jellytot: It was a successor group to the 43 Group. The 43 Group were active in the late 40’s….the 62 Group in the early 60’s. They were practically identical in terms of their methodology.

    They would be tarred with the slur “Squadist” today by those who want to monopolize anti-fascism but theywere effective.

    Thank you for this info Jellytot it was a genuine question. I didn’t know. I’d read of course the 43 group book years ago which was published by Centrepoint in the 1990s.

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  12. John Grimshaw on said:

    Andy Newman: This was actually a quite consistent policy of Mosley’s, consistent with the pan- European views of other fascists like Leon Degrelle.The BUF opposed WW2 on the platform of pan Europeanism “no more brother wars”.

    Those opposing Mosley in 1962 were unlikely to give a toss about his views on Europe.

    Mostly you point is just silly

    Thank you Andy. I was just speculating. Probably stupid since both you and I voted remain, in my case reluctantly. As you have said elsewhere the reluctant remainers shouldn’t make a virtue out of the EU but I think also neither should the lexiteers make a virtue out of the somewhat bizarre Tory organised referendum.

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  13. Karl Stewart on said:

    John Grimshaw: I have a postcard indoors of Lenin giving a speech which was given to us by a Russian friend which clearly shows Trotsky standing to one side (don’t know what he was doing) but it is the original of the one that was then famously doctored by Stalin (or his oppos) and then Trotsky disappeared.

    There was no ‘Stalinist’ alteration of any photos comrade.

    The truth is Trotsky just popped out for a quick smoke, so he wasn’t in the second one.

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  14. John Grimshaw: Thank you for this info Jellytot it was a genuine question. I didn’t know. I’d read of course the 43 group book years ago which was published by Centrepoint in the 1990s.

    Been on my reading list for a long while that, really must get around to it. For a broad-brush history of anti-fascism in Britain, the best and most evenhanded book I’ve read is Anti-Fascism in Britain by Nigel Copsey, although Physical Resistance by Dave Hann is also excellent, with a slight “squadist” bias which doesn’t bother me in the slightest.

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  15. #22 Dave was a friend of mine, although we didn’t always see eye to eye politically.

    He was a sad loss to the movement.

    What was nice was that people who wanted to pay tribute to him were asked to make donations to the International Brigade Memorial Trust.

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  16. George W on said:

    Ted,

    It’s a good book. Love the bit about using a notorious gangster to threaten the BNP when they tried to set up a south Manchester branch.

    So is Beating the Fascists: The Untold Story of Anti-fascist Action.

    There’s very much different spins on the same events in both books so read them and make your own mind!

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  17. John Grimshaw on said:

    Jellytot: ……Or those brutal Russian fags that the Robert Duvall character smoked in “The Eagle has Landed” !

    Great movie.

    They had holes in the filters, especially the Cuban ones. I know. I had to smoke them when I was working in France. 🙂

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