Obama: ‘Cuba’s not a threat to the United States.’

Though there is much I have and do disagree with when it comes to the Obama administration – as per my recent RT articles on both Cuba and Iran – his recent framework agreement with Iran over its nuclear program and his meeting with Cuban leader, Raul Castro, at the Summit of the Americas in Panama, marks him out as a statesman. Given the racism he’s had to deal with while in office, and with a Republican opposition that is off the scale in how it has sought to undermine him at every turn, the way he has maintained his dignity and equanimity throughout has been extraordinary.

This press conference provides evidence of those qualities.

12 comments on “Obama: ‘Cuba’s not a threat to the United States.’

  1. Vanya on said:

    Also, as I’ve mentioned before, the Cuban government have taken an entirely principled position with regard to the increase in US pressure on Venezuela. The fact that it coincides with the rapprochement between the US and Cuba will not reduce Cuba’s solidarity with Venezuela, and this was reiterated only the other day.

  2. I’m currently in Los Angeles, over doing work on the upcoming Mayweather v Pacquaio fight, and the extent to which Obama is excoriated in the right wing media over here is staggering. He’s routinely depicted as an enemy occupant of the White House.

    I haven’t been here in six years, and it’s been ten years since I used to live in LA, but another thing that’s noticeable are the number of incidents of police brutality against unarmed black men and suspects. The Walter Scott case has at least resulted in the officer involved being charged with murder, but another case involving San Bernadino Sheriff’s deputies beating the shit of a suspect after chasing him on a horse is even worse.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KIKUEjn3Z0

  3. Vanya on said:

    #2 I’ve just seen a piece on facebook about a female cop in Pennsylvania shooting a guy in the back fatally while he was lying face down. She’s been charged with unlawful homicide.

    We’ll see.

  4. This from the WSWS on Cuba’s move towards rapprochement with Washington:

    ‘The bourgeois nationalist regime in Cuba sees an opening to the US as a means of furthering its policy of privatization and capitalist development, which it hopes will preserve its own power and privileges along the lines pursued by its counterpart in China.’

    http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2015/04/11/sota-a11.html

    Left wing communism is indeed an infantile disorder.

  5. Jellytot on said:

    John,

    Fox News is like an open sewer but given the blatant nature of the Walter Scott murder not even they could bullshit about it and defend the police officer involved (although they did attempt to ignore it last week by concentrating on Rand Paul’s presidential bid announcement). Once the video was released the DA moved quickly to charge the officer with murder (an incredibly rare event) as they didn’t want the possibility of a Ferguson type riot. If that video did not exist then they would have accepted the officer’s initial story of him feeling that Scott was endangering his life.

    What has changed in the past year is Working Class Black people are rising up against the blatantly racist policing which continues to be the norm in America.

  6. Andy Newman on said:

    Jellytot: What has changed in the past year is Working Class Black people are rising up against the blatantly racist policing which continues to be the norm in America.

    and they have camera phones

  7. John Grimshaw on said:

    “Chavez’s successor, Nicolas Maduro, having failed to persuade fellow OPEC members to reduce production, has seen his government engulfed in chaos as the country has found meeting its external debt obligations while maintaining economic stability at home an impossible task.” This is from your article on RT John. I assume you mean Maduro has failed to get OPEC to reduce oil production largely because the Saudis are not interested. The Saudis have calculated that they can deal with the price falls if it means they can win some kind of victory over Shia Iran and that it will help them win their current conflict in Yemen. Equally the USA’s imperialist policy makes them happy to back the Saudis oil policy precisely because it is helpin to bring the Maduro regime down. Of course mas fracking means the Americans ar temporarily not as reliant on oil. I assume therefore that you think that Obama’s strategy is one of divide and rule, separating the Maduro regime from the Castro governent?

  8. Vanya on said:

    #6 Very good point.

    Back here, if it hadn’t been for a tourist with a phone camera the investigation into the death of Ian Tomlinson would almost certainly have exonerated the Police entirely, with not even a trial, as the police officers tasked with “investigating” were apparently unable to locate any relevant cctv footage in one of the most “camered up” cities in the world.

  9. John Grimshaw: I assume you mean Maduro has failed to get OPEC to reduce oil production largely because the Saudis are not interested. The Saudis have calculated that they can deal with the price falls if it means they can win some kind of victory over Shia Iran and that it will help them win their current conflict in Yemen. Equally the USA’s imperialist policy makes them happy to back the Saudis oil policy precisely because it is helpin to bring the Maduro regime down. Of course mas fracking means the Americans ar temporarily not as reliant on oil. I assume therefore that you think that Obama’s strategy is one of divide and rule, separating the Maduro regime from the Castro governent?

    These are all good points, though I suggest you’re making assumptions here rather than sharing facts.

    The Saudis of course have long used the dominant position within OPEC for political ends, and you’re right with regard to the lessening of demand for overseas sources of energy by the US as domestic supply has gone up vis-a-vis fracking.

    However I think the Saudi position on production quotas is more to do with driving out rival producers than specifically designed to weaken Iran over Yemen or in the region as a whole.

    Interestingly, Obama appears to have stepped back from his earlier statement that Venezuela constitutes a threat to US national security. He was very conciliatory at the Summit of the Americas, evidence that Latin America as a region is no longer dominated by Washington and also of the limits of the ability of the US to control the region in the wake of Iraq and the ongoing crisis in the MEast.

  10. Andy Newman on said:

    John: However I think the Saudi position on production quotas is more to do with driving out rival producers than specifically designed to weaken Iran over Yemen or in the region as a whole.

    In Said Arbursh’s book about the house of Saud IIRC, he argues that the Saudis have ever since the early 1970s seen a strategic advantage in marginally stepping up production whenever the OPEc cartel generally favours cutting back.

    What they are seeking to achieve is to be perceived as a brake on rising prices, and thus buy themselves the status as indispensible ally of the USA.