Patronise Jeremy Corbyn at your peril – he can win

jeremy Corbyn 1It was probably inevitable that as soon as Jeremy Corbyn succeeded in making it onto the ballot for the Labour leadership contest, a frog’s chorus of swivel eyed Tories and Blairites would unleash a barrage of ridicule and scorn over his prospects.

Their ire reflects discomfort at the airing of ideas that run counter to the cosy consensus that has prevailed for far too long when it comes to the economy and the role of government. For ‘them’ the economy should be a tyrant rather than a servant, its role to punish poverty rather than end it, wherein moral virtue is ascribed to unfettered wealth rather than its taxation and redistribution for the common good.

The manner in which Jeremy Corbyn and the ideas he stands for have been patronised and dismissed is instructive. In so doing, however, ‘they’ – this smug commentariat – merely evince the complacency of those sitting on top of a mountain that is about to erupt with the volcanic rage of millions whose lives have been reduced to a daily struggle against unremitting despair as destitution threatens.

The huge disparity in wealth and power that exists today in British society has created an chasm in outlook, with the decimation of Labour in Scotland irrefutable evidence of an end to politics as usual. Decades of Thatherite nostrums, embraced by both Tories and Labour alike, has left millions marginalised and effectively disenfranchised, yet going by the response of the Labour Party hierarchy to the party’s humiliating defeat at the last general election, you would think they were living in a parallel universe.

Mimicking the Tories on austerity, immigration, and welfare can be described as many things, but progressive politics it is not. Austerity is no more than a mass experiment in human despair. It is not only morally reprehensible, it is economically illiterate, given that it is designed to reduce the consumption of the poor and those lower down the income scale, and with it the demand for goods and services that forms the basis of any healthy economy.

On immigration, this is of course a symptom of austerity in diverting people’s attention away from the causes of the global recession that swept the globe in 2007/08 away from the banks onto the ‘other’. The ideological assault on working people and the public sector, using the economic crisis as a pretext – an economic 9/11 if you will – will go down in history as one of the most sustained and vicious ever seen. Immigration and immigrants has been exploited as a convenient lightening rod by the Tory establishment and their bag carriers in the media, unleashing the most base instincts residing in the victims of austerity and eminently dangerous for all that. The emergence of UKIP in recent years, the fact they managed to gain four million votes at the last election, leaves no doubt of it.

Jeremy Corbyn represents the last vestige of hope for a Labour Party that is now almost unrecognisable from its founding principles of equality and social and economic justice for working class people. Its high water mark came in the postwar period, when led by Clement Attlee it came to power committed to transforming British society from the bottom up, challenging and defeating in the process the vested interests and economic power of the elite. It saw for the first time in Britain a government acting as a check on the unfettered power of market forces rather than an enabler of them. Faced with a national debt of over 200 percent of GDP its achievements were phenomenal, responsible for forging a humane society in which working people were regarded as the end instead of the means to the end, a first in the nation’s social history.

In 2015 we are living in a cold, cruel, and desolate country in which benefit sanctions, foodbanks, poverty wages, and ignorance reign, governed by a clutch of rich, privately educated sociopaths whose conception of society has been ripped straight from the pages of a dystopian novel. Jeremy Corbyn remains one of the few members of parliament that have refused to succumb to this normalisation of brutality, and indeed is among the last of the Mohicans within the PLP who can sing the party’s anthem – The Red Flag – at its annual conference without experiencing pangs of hypocrisy.

His bid for the leadership of Labour is a serious one. The only candidate who can legitimately claim to be standing for the values the party was founded on, the political and media establishment underestimate him at their peril.

If he wins it will change everything.

82 comments on “Patronise Jeremy Corbyn at your peril – he can win

  1. Vanya on said:

    Loads of obnoxious shite on Labour Uncut. Including a lecture on un-electability from someone in a Scottish CLP (and not Edinburgh East either) 🙂 I kid you not!

  2. jack ford: He’s not going to win but I’m glad he’s in the contest

    This is constantly being repeated, but I think we need to discard the ‘meme’ that Jeremy doesn’t have a chance of winning. We need to get a serious campaign going for Jeremy, and to do that we need to aim to win.

    The deciding factors in this election will be (a) how many of the potential 3 million trade union members are organised & encouraged to register to vote, and (b), if sufficient of them do register, who they decide to vote for.

    Jeremy is the only candidate who can inspire people and generate any enthusiasm. He is also the only candidate who supports the policies of the trade union movement on the key issues.

    And if the national leaderships of the big unions were to show the political courage to put the open backing and organisational & financial resources of the trade unions behind Jeremy’s campaign, the nature of this contest would change completely.

  3. Joseph on said:

    If he did win it would be interesting to see what would happen to the Labour party. Half the parliamentary party would probably resign and start their own party.

  4. Joseph on said:

    If [Corbyn] wins it will change everything.

    It’s doubled edged. Running a candidate in this election does give the left a voice, but it also gives a chance for that voice to be defeated and told it’s time to shut up after the defeat.

  5. Andy Newman on said:

    Joseph: It’s doubled edged. Running a candidate in this election does give the left a voice, but it also gives a chance for that voice to be defeated and told it’s time to shut up after the defeat.

    What does victory and defeat look like in this contest.

    It is an election conducted under AV, where each voters lists the candidates in preference, and the second and subsequent preferences are transferred from the eliminated candidate with the lowest vote in each round, the winning candidate being the one who eventually has 50% + 1 or more votes.

    I think that the abolition of the electoral college, and the accepting of supporter votes means that Jeremy can do far better than some commentators expect. His first preference vote may be high.

    But how well would he do on second preferences? For example, if Liz Kendall was eliminated first, I am sure almost no second preferences from her voters would go to Jeremy. To actually cross the 50% line would be hard.

    But equally, if the Corbyh voting consitutuency is high, then the two centrist candidates will have to seek the second preference voters from the left to hope to win. Had Jeremy not been on the ballot, both Cooper and Burnham would have been pitching for the Blairite transfers from Kendall’s supporters. Instead they will have to court the left, to at least a certain extent.

    So being on the ballot paper is a major strategic victory for the left, and our aim must be to get the highest possible first preference vote for Corbyn.

    realistically, I don’t believe it is possible for Corbyn to get more than 50%. But a Cooper or Burnham victory where they were carried over the line by Corbyn’s second preferences would be put the left in our strongest position for a generation.

    BTY, I know some on the left are supporting Angela Eagle for Deputy, but I am backing Tom Watson.

  6. John grimshaw on said:

    Anybody got any statistics for post election how much the membership has gone up by? I’m hearing 40,000 or so? I’m also hearing of people who haven’t been involved ever or for a very long time joining to vote for Corbyn.

  7. james? on said:

    if its taken seriously he could come close to winning or even win the new labour leader voting system means everyone has one vote and all votes are equal it also means that non-members who dont support another party can pay three pound to vote. if he wins they will probably call another election in a year and make sure he is nt on the ballot paper.

  8. robert p. williams on said:

    #10 Who’s? your first pref. Andy?

    I don’t think Corbyn would win, but I certainly hope he gets as many votes as possible.

    However, even if he did win, he wouldn’t get any policy through the impenetrable wall of right wing careerists that control policy and candidate selection in the Labour Party.

    So I hope Corbyn does well as this will expose the undemocratic reality of the Labour Party and demonstrate the potential for building a new mass workers party.

  9. Sam64 on said:

    I’m all for using modern media to enable voting but perhaps the ‘Text £3 to vote for the next Labour leader!’ I saw in the paper (Guardian, would be interested to know if the ad was run in the Mirror) this morning is taking things a little too far.

    Sort of reminded me of how easy the SWP made it to join their (inflated) ranks years ago – only in that case nobody got a chance to vote for the leader.

  10. Mike Liddiment on said:

    Andy Newman,

    It would be better to not place any transferable second preference vote, if that is possible without spoiling you ballot paper.

  11. Vanya on said:

    #13 Well in the short term a Corbyn victory will make your uphill struggle to convince anyone of the merits of your project an even more unenviable one, especially in the short to medium term.

    I predict that what it would result in is a further, even bigger influx into the Labour Party of enthused people, including veteran leftists (both ex-Labour Party members and some who have never joined) and younger people newer to politics and previously alienated by parties.

    As for whether and how soon they became disenchanted, the extent to which the Blairite and other right and centre factions were be able to put the brake on or sabotage decent policies etc (for the reasons you suggest) only time would tell.

    I say “would” because he has to win first, although for the reasons outlined by others above, this isn’t in fact a completely outlandish possibility.

  12. P Spence on said:

    The new voting system is wide open to whoever gets their machine working best . The PLP may come to see that they made a big mistake allowing JC on the ballot.

    Whichever candidate can mobilise enough “Labour supporters” to register for £3.00 may be the winner. I have already spoken to half a dozen friends and family to persuade them to join and vote for Jeremy. The LRC are leafleting on Saturday at the march to encourage all lefties to do the same. With momentum and perhaps union organisational muscle JC could provide a shock.

  13. robert p. williams on said:

    Do you HAVE to pick a second preference?

    I mean the others are not left wing are they.

  14. nattyfoc on said:

    P Spence:
    The new voting system is wide open to whoever gets their machine working best . The PLP may come to see that they made a big mistake allowing JC on the ballot.

    Whichever candidate can mobilise enough “Labour supporters” to register for £3.00 may be the winner. I have already spoken to half a dozen friends and family to persuade them to join and vote for Jeremy. The LRC are leafleting on Saturday at the march to encourage all lefties to do the same. With momentum and perhaps union organisational muscle JC could provide a shock.

    And the Daily Mirror with 15 million readers will encourage the £3 option to vote for Corbyn i think he’s home and dry …………………..of course you dont have to use the second preference option just vote Corbyn ……………………must say this issue has revitalised the Party, but theres a lot of work to do with the Unions plenty General Secretarys will ignore their members preference’s and recommend a right winger ie any of the others !

    and the LRC leafleting input this Sat could be important and dont forget Jeremy is speaking at that demo!

    heres hoping !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  15. Karl Stewart on said:

    Like other commentators on here, I also think Corbyn could do better than many are predicting and I share JohnG’s puzzlement at right-wing MPs nominating him.

    I wonder if some of them may have calculated that a Corbyn candidacy could take votes from Burnham and thereby inadvertently assist Kendall?

    If that is their thinking, then I reckon that’s much mistaken. A Corbyn candidacy – his presence on the ballot and therefore at every hustings – is indeed a major strategic gain for the left in itself as it shifts the political terrain of the leadership debate significantly leftwards.

    It’s clearly all become a bit too much for poor old Dan “Katie Hopkins” Hodges of the Daily Telegraph, whose latest ramblings on Labour’s leadership contest almost foam up at you from the page…

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/general-election-2015/politics-blog/11675756/The-lunatic-wing-of-the-Labour-Party-is-still-calling-the-shots.html

    …but having laughed out loud at his frankly bizarre incandescence – his “Corbyn Quislings” is particularly memorable for example – one has to admit that Hodges actually does set out a logical and coherent explanation of how Corbyn’s candidacy has indeed shifted the whole leadership debate leftwards.

    He’s right that both Burnham and Cooper – and even Kendall if she’s serious about wanting to win – will be mindful of the fact that it’s in each of their own interests to try to win second-choice votes from Corbyn supporters and will not want to be seen as hostile or dismissive of Corbyn’s underlying political philosophy altogether.

    Corbyn, on the other hand, has no need of any such considerations.

    It will be an extremely interesting constest and it could surprise a lot of people.

  16. No to EU on said:

    I have to admit I was hoping Kate Hoey would stand. If Frank Field was deputy it would be a dream ticket. The working class would flood back to Labour

  17. Andy Newman on said:

    Karl Stewart,

    Nominating Corbyn to help Kendall makes no sense, only 6 people who voted for David M in 2010 nominated Corbyn, and that includes Jon Cruddas and Dennis Skinner, as well as David Lammy and Rushanara Ali and my observation is that BAME MPs seem generally less supportive of Kendall, perhaps due to those comments about the education systam needing to prioritise white children.

    Jeremy’s broad spread of nominations indicates that there is a recognition of the coalitional nature of the party, and the danger of a large constituency in the party beind disenfranchised

  18. Omar on said:

    Any info on how to join the LP so I can vote for The Corbmeister ? I don’t do text so an online or over-the-phone with someone at the other end is my preference.

  19. Karl Stewart on said:

    No to EU,
    I’ve always liked Kate Hoey a lot, she’s a solid pro-union MP.

    But I think Frank Field is a thoroughly nasty piece of work.

    I heard him make a speech once in which he talked extremely disparagingly about his own constituents who are on welfare. I can’t recall the exact word he used but it was something along the lines of either “scum” or “vermin” or “trash”.

    Needless to say, he was a long way from his constituency when he said it. It was a speech made at a fund-raiser for a CLP down here three or four years ago and several of us present thought it was probably the most offensive speech we’d ever heard from a Labour person – Frank Field is a truly revolting individual.

  20. nattyfoc on said:

    No to EU:
    I have to admit I was hoping Kate Hoey would stand.If Frank Field was deputy it would be a dream ticket.The working class would flood back to Labour

    Kate Hoey the monarchy worshiping Orange Lodge supporting specimen no thanks!

  21. Noah,

    Ta. It’s not a web address I normally have much use for, you understand.

    EDIT: Doh! I’m a Unite member so should be able to do it for free, no?

  22. Omar:
    Noah,
    Doh! I’m a Unite member so should be able to do it for free, no?

    Yep, though if you skimp on the three quid you might not get the personalised e-mail from Harriet… Surely that’s worth the price alone? 😉

  23. Matty on said:

    robert p. williams,

    Burnham and Cooper might not be all that left-wing but they are clearly more left than Kendall so of course people should use their second preferences. They would only be used if Jeremy was elimanted before the final round so they can’t be used against Corbyn.

  24. Matty on said:

    Sam64,

    The idea was to make the leadership election a bit like a US primary. The £3 doesn’t make you a Labour Party member, only a registered supporter. Ironically, some on the right are now worried that Corbyn will get a boost from this system.

  25. Andy Newman on said:

    Matty,

    There is of course not just one right. Progress support open primaries, the more traditional trade union oriented right oppose them.

    Ironically the Collins review changes have benefitted Corbyn as the ekectoral college advantage of MPs has gone, and previously the big unions would have ensured the victory of a centre candidate and blocked both Kendall and Corbyn

  26. Vanya on said:

    Don’t know how old this news is, but ASLEF apparently are supporting Jeremy.

  27. Andy Newman on said:

    Vanya,

    Well ASLEF has 18000 members, to put that in perspective just 4 times bigger than my GMB branch. Assuming that ASLEF sign up 10% of their members to vote (ambitious), that half of those entitled to vote do so (perhaps) and half follow ASLEF’s recommendation, that would be 500 votes.

    Keep the champagne on ice for now

  28. Matty on said:

    Andy Newman,

    Yep, it’s not a big union but it’s a well-organised one and hopefully they might have a little cash/resources that they could donate to the Corbyn campaign. Speaking of unions, will McCluskey support Corbyn or will he bottle it?

  29. jim mclean on said:

    One member who attended the hustings seemed to think Corbyn spoke well but did not seem like a man wanting to win and the only candidate not to hand out promotional material.
    He ranked the overall performance as Cooper, Burnham, Corbyn and Kendall a poor fourth. The deputy leadership he ranked as all crap with Watson being crap but more professional than the rest.

  30. Andy Newman: Ironically the Collins review changes have benefitted Corbyn

    Indeed.

    At the rally in London today, Jeremy Corbyn spoke very well and his speech was, naturally, cheered enthusiastically. Just as importantly, speakers from the platform were calling on everyone attending to register and vote for Jeremy. Could that really occur- 250,000+ votes for Corbyn? If you are committed enough to get on a coach and travel to London for a March, why would you not go to the trouble of paying £3 and spending two minutes on the Labour Party website to sign up?

    Of course, following up on this this needs to become the priority task for hundreds of motivated people. Nothing happens without organisation.

    Matty: Speaking of unions, will McCluskey support Corbyn or will he bottle it?

    The answer to this question could determine the nature of politics in Britain for the next several years. If UNITE decides to give its open, official, unequivocal and total backing to Jeremy, it will suddenly become apparent that his campaign is winnable.

    If so, my prediction would be that the organised ruling class will go into panic mode, and start to unleash a torrential onslaught of vitriol and manipulation to try to prevent Jeremy getting the job.

  31. jim mclean on said:

    Noah,

    Organised Ruling Class, whatever, never came across them before. OMOV has created a situation where the choice will be Burnham or Cooper. Again I must say their is a perception Corbyn does not want to win.

  32. jim mclean: OMOV has created a situation where the choice will be Burnham or Cooper.

    If OMOV was restricted to existing full members of the Labour Party you would be correct. But it’s opened up to (potentially) 2.5 million plus trade unionists and as many other supporters as can be enthused and organised to take part.

    jim mclean: their is a perception Corbyn does not want to win.

    Jeremy is the opposite of the self-promoting, career politician. He is all about the movement, and his genuineness shows the others up, by contrast, as spin-doctored and artificial. This works for him, as shown by the audience reaction to the Newsnight debate.

  33. jim mclean on said:

    Noah: But it’s opened up to (potentially) 2.5 million plus trade unionists

    With six weeks to organise this and Corbyn 100% without a machine. He will beat Kendal and should get a place in the shadow cabinet. If he had stood for deputy leader he would have walked it.

  34. P Spence on said:

    I was handing out Corbyn leaflets. The response was very good although apparent many had not grasped they could vote for £3. Organisation now the key and that might need some Union muscle. Come on Unite.

  35. Matty on said:

    jim mclean,

    I met my wife at the march yesterday and was pleased to see that amongst the half-dozen or so leaflets she had, two were leaflets for Jeremy, one from his official campaign and one from the LRC, both encouraging people to sign up and vote for him. Bob Crow: “If you fight, you might lose …But if you don’t, you will always lose. ”
    Was your friend at the hustings a Corbyn supporter? It would have been good if he or she had taken some leaflets to distribute. I hope that’s not a harsh criticism as I too have been guilty of crossing my fingers and relying on others to do what I could have done. Hopefully, Andy N will be volunteering to distribute Corbyn leaflets at the Swindon hustings.

  36. jim mclean: Corbyn 100% without a machine.

    The People’s Assembly got 1/4 million people into central London yesterday. In the most recent general secretary election, UNITE persuaded 223,000 of its members to participate by casting a vote.

    The machinery is there and available, if leaders and activists in the key positions have the courage and the nouse to put it to use.

  37. jim mclean on said:

    Matty,

    Just know the i was talking to said he got no material at the hustings. Still think the best strategy for the left would have been to go for the Deputy leadership, I’ll vote go Corbyn 1, Cooper 2 and forget the others.

  38. Andy Newman on said:

    Matty: Hopefully, Andy N will be volunteering to distribute Corbyn leaflets at the Swindon hustings.

    I am in Chippenham CLP now.

  39. Andy Newman on said:

    P Spence: Organisation now the key and that might need some Union muscle. Come on Unite.

    I take no view on what Unite should or shouldn’t do.

    The difficulty is this. Unions have traditionally acted as ballast within the Labour Party to seek to ensure that electable leaders and policies are selected and chosen.

    Judging all the four candidates by that criteria, it is hard to see any of them ever winning a general election.

    On that basis I foresee difficulty in getting any of the big unions to wholeheartedly endorse Corbyn, though as individuals many union officers will support and vote for Corbyn.

  40. Andy Newman: Unions have traditionally acted as ballast within the Labour Party to seek to ensure that electable leaders and policies are selected and chosen.

    Judging all the four candidates by that criteria, it is hard to see any of them ever winning a general election.

    Hang on Andy… five years ago, weren’t we all being told that the ‘electable’ candidate was David Miliband? Yet the big union backing went to Ed. And a very good thing that it did.

    As for the current potential leaders electability, I agree insofar as Burnham, Cooper and Kendall, are not electable.

    Of course, as I have argued in previous comments on this blog, a route to electoral victory based on opposing austerity would be very far from easy or straightforward. It would be resisted by the ruling elite using every means at hand, and they have quite a few. So Corbyn does not guarantee a Labour election victory.

    However, the electoral strategy pursued by the Labour Party since Kinnock became leader, of trying to avoid challenging the main capitalist agenda, is not working right now, and is not going to any time soon. Why? Because the capitalist establishment, who it is meant to appease (and thus get some media support etc), by far prefers to have the (real) Tories in power in order to push through the radical austerity & neo-liberal programme. So that’s a dead end and almost certainly will be for a very a long time.

  41. Omagh on said:

    Noah,

    Corbyn’s ability to make the case for an anti-austerity direction can’t be understated. There is an awful lot of unspent political resource out there – people who did not vote because they have no faith in the big four and there almost identical script on the main issues – which will build further due to the onslaught of cuts.

    It is very interesting too watching the Greek situation unfold and what is a genuine attempt to take on the logic of the IMF.

  42. Noah on said:

    Vanya,

    Brilliant news. Hopefully Unite will now be making a real push to sign members up as affiliated supporters.

    Notably, the media manipulation against Jeremy is going up a gear, with most of the press coverage today boosting the patently fraudulent ‘Tories for Corbyn’ attempt to discredit Jeremy. I say patently fraudulent; but this kind of scam does have an impact and there will be plenty more on the way from where that came from. Let’s be prepared.

  43. nattyfoc on said:

    Well done Unite though evidently the GS wasnt amused ?

    As for Burnham have you read his grovelling episcile to Jug Ears Charlie boy. what a sycophant!

    That destroyed his credibility for all time surely ?

    Wonder where others will place their bets GMB PCS etc ?

  44. Noah: Hopefully Unite will now be making a real push to sign members up as affiliated supporters.

    It looks like Unite’s efforts are starting to bear fruit. The Guardian is reporting that 30,000 Unite members have signed up, and will be added to 12,511 affiliated supporters and 12,266 registers supporters who are already on the voting list. Also, there are about 45,000 full Labour Party members who have joined very recently.

    So 100,000 new entrants so far to the Labour movement’s democratic political process- of whom a high proportion will be likely to vote for Jeremy.

    If we can increase that to 200,000 new participants by August 12 (deadline for registering) then the prospects for winning this contest will really open up.

    More very good news. Jeremy has 28 constituency nominations, in second place behind Burnham who is on 33.

    Jeremy is no longer an outsider. If we prioritise and focus on this task, he can become Labour Leader- which would radically change politics in the UK .

    This is the opportunity that we on the Left have been waiting for- even if (like me) we didn’t know we were waiting for it! It could be a very close vote, and every effort will count.

    Come on, everybody. Click here to volunteer for Jeremy’s campaign:

    http://www.jeremyforlabour.com/volunteer

  45. Noah on said:

    Amazing vote at my local Constituency Labour Party (Tottenham) nominations meeting this evening: Andy Burnham 10. Yvette Cooper 14. Liz Kendall 16. Jeremy Corbyn 57. Highly polarised debate with little middle ground, Stormy applause for all pro-Jeremy speeches. By the way, this is not traditional left territory within the Labour Party (Tottenham nominated Tessa Jowell for London Mayor).

    Jeremy and Andy Burnham are now neck and neck for CLP nominations. Something is happening here, and we all need to get stuck in. Don’t lose a moment, as registration for the vote ends on August 12th.

  46. John Grimshaw on said:

    The Daily Mail and the Telegraph are openly calling on “Tory” supporters to join the Labour Party to vote in Corbyn. The LP says it has sufficient guards in place to weed out these “cheats”. The Mail is putting Corbyn 15% in front.

  47. Noah on said:

    John Grimshaw: The Daily Mail and the Telegraph are openly calling on “Tory” supporters to join the Labour Party to vote in Corbyn

    This is a spoiling tactic to smear Jeremy as ‘Tory-backed’ and label him as a leader who can never win a general election, It is designed to affect the vote, but by putting Labour Party members off Corbyn, it aims to reduce his chances of winning.

    It’s important that this con is challenged not promoted, as it is being used by the right wing inside the Labour Party to undermine support for Jeremy.

  48. Noah on said:

    John Grimshaw: The Daily Mail and the Telegraph are openly calling on “Tory” supporters to join the Labour Party to vote in Corbyn.

    Another likely purpose of this con is that, if Jeremy wins, the right wing in the Labour Party (and the media) will have it as a pretext to challenge the legitimacy of the result.

  49. nattyfoc on said:

    Noah: Another likely purpose of this con is that, if Jeremy wins, the right wing in the Labour Party (and the media) will have it as a pretext to challenge the legitimacy of the result.

    Really how could they sink so low ?

  50. Noah on said:

    nattyfoc: Really how could they sink so low ?

    If Jeremy actually becomes the leader of the Labour Party, expect the class enemy, and their representatives within the Party, to utilise every dirty trick you can imagine- and more that we can’t yet imagine- to block the Party from achieving power.

    Does that mean that they are right to sneer that he is ‘unelectable’? Not at all. It just means that we need to make good on Jeremy’s point that Labour needs to become a social movement. Thus, campaigning on the streets as the Labour Party to defeat the cuts; involving the Party with the ‘single issue’ campaigns, eg Palestine Solidarity; and working closely and publicly with the trade unions. Party membership, plus the registered and affiliated supporters, must be well over 300,000 by now and with Jeremy as leader we should aim to raise that to over half a million.

    The opportunity is there to begin creating a real mass movement that can involve and inspire people, generating the level of hope and understanding that we will need in order to make a serious challenge at the next general election.

    I say ‘is there’, because there is no particular reason to wait until the leadership result is announced. Campaigning in the streets now, under the Labour Party banner where possible, and signing people up to vote in the leadership contest, will assist the gathering momentum to get Jeremy elected.

  51. P Spence on said:

    I was telecanvassing last night for JC. There were 25 to 30 people present. All but one or two were in their 20s. I was encouraged. In terms of membership the SNP now set the benchmark: we need 1 million people to succeed.

  52. Andy Newman on said:

    At Regional Committee of GMB southern region last week we voted to support Corbyn, and Watson for deputy.

  53. jqmark on said:

    i know that several people anecdotally in several different parties who have stood against labour in the elections are considering registering to vote for corbyn and may even have done so by now, all the his oponements have to do is search the data base for them and they can then cancel the election, i urge people who are identifiable as supporters of another party in may to stop registering to vote for corbyn. on the off chance he becomes leader you will lead to him being removed as the election illegimate and also deligimitising your own political party as not serious if data protection is breached and this leaks out.

  54. nattyfoc on said:

    Andy Newman: Corbyn

    thats good no Doubt Paul Moloney did his bit ??

    Was it carried unanimously ?

    Did you support that motion Andy ?

  55. John Grimshaw on said:

    jqmark,

    Clearly if there are Tories registering as the Mail and the Telegraph have been urging that is one thing. However there will be lefties who have long ago left the LP or stopped seeing it as any kind of solution who may want to register to support JC. I see no problem with that. Presumably if the new era of JC comes to pass these people may not just be passing through. Especially if there is some kind of Blairite sabotage or SDP style split?

  56. jqmark on said:

    there is no problem with it no but if the people have stood against labour in the local or parliamentary elections in may as for example left unity/tusc respect or the greens then they will bring there own parties in to disrepute and they risk being used as a reason to cancel the process on the grounds that the labour machine is unable to verify the voters properly. i hope the people i have heard anecdotally considering this have been convinced not to do it. of course if your an ex-labour supporter or someone who has never backed labour and want to back corbyn do it as long as your not easily identifiable as a suppoter of another party then you could be harming corbyn.
    John Grimshaw,

  57. Feodor on said:

    Worth noting that Miranda Green of Lib Dem fame said on last week’s This Week that she had been trying to sign-up as an affiliated supporter so as to vote against Corbyn. So delegitimising the result could swing both ways.