Sign the petition calling for Netanyahu’s arrest when he visits the UK

CNf3DU7WIAAsX4c CNf3DU7WIAAsX4cIf you haven’t signed the petition please do so now and join the over 90,000-plus who have thus far.

At 100,000 signatures the petition will be considered for debate in Parliament.

Even if it doesn’t make it to Parliament, it is still crucial to record the widespread and growing opposition to the Israeli Government’s brutal and barbaric treatement of the Palestinian people.

 

 

12 comments on “Sign the petition calling for Netanyahu’s arrest when he visits the UK

  1. I hope Netanyahu and his ilk do one day meet justice, and this petition is a good PR stunt to raise awareness of the crimes committed against Palestinians. However, in reality I don’t think arresting serving heads of state is good practise.

  2. I’ve signed it.

    The response from the government, that serving heads of state have immunity from prosecution is interesting.

    In the case of Iraq that problem was of course dealt with by an illegal invasion that led to the toppling of the serving head of state.

    And in the case of Chile, we didn’t manage to do anything about Pinochet (ie extradite him to Spain) even though he was no longer the head of state.

    As for Noriega…

  3. I’ve signed it and judging by the number of signatures (91k plus) there’s likely to be a parliamentary debate on the matter. Would be an interesting one for Jeremy Corbyn if he’s leader by then.

    There is an ICC arrest warrant out for Omar al-Bashir, President of Sudan for war crimes in Dafour. He seems to get around OK, off to China in a couple of days I gather.

  4. No to EU on said:

    But the Baathist regime was despicable No?

    Vanya: In the case of Iraq that problem was of course dealt with by an illegal invasion that led to the toppling of the serving head of state.

  5. #5 Relevance to the point?

    If international rule of law is sacrosanct (as it was deemed to be when Socialist Vietnam helped overthrow the Pol Pot/ Khieu Samphan regime) then it’s of no relevance whatsoever.

  6. #2 …Britain gave full support to the invasion of Panama and overthrow of Noriega, who of course was then taken to the USA to face trial.

  7. If of course the British government felt that the argument about serving heads of state was a clincher they wouldn’t need to follow this point with a load of bull about how they are trying to help find a constructive solution to the conflict between Israel (“our” close ally as they also point out) and the Palestinians.

    Funnilly enough when at least one Israeli prime minister who was deemed to be involved directly in the killings of British service personnel in the King David Hotel bombings and the hanging of hostages ceased to hold office no attempt was made to arrest him.

    And is a prime minister legally head of state anyway?

  8. #8 And before anyone mentions the IRA, there was no Downing Street Declaration or Good Friday Agreement in respect of Britain’s relations with those who carried out terrorist (using the term objectively) actions against British service personnel in Palestine.

    Bibi by the way has taken part in ceremonies to honour those who bombed the King David Hotel.

  9. No to EU on said:

    Not sure I understand what you are saying

    Most people supported the overthrow of the KR

    Esp in Cambodia

    Vanya: If international rule of law is sacrosanct (as it was deemed to be when Socialist Vietnam helped overthrow the Pol Pot/ Khieu Samphan regime) then it’s of no relevance whatsoever.

  10. #10 My point is that the Western imperialist powers and China (which was essentially allied to them then, and was the main ally of the “Khmer Rouge”) refused to accept that the new government was the legitimate government of Kampuchea because it was treated as a creation of regime change by outside military intervention (by a country they didn’t like).

    For that reason the former government continued to be recognised by the UN, and the “Khmer Rouge” and its allies were represented in the General Assembly for many years.

    During that time those same forces were aided in their armed insurgency against the new government by special forces from several western countries.

    So it’s not so straightforward to say most people supported the overthrow of the “Khmer Rouge”.

    Probably more than supported the invasion of Iraq though.

  11. Karl Stewart on said:

    No to EU,
    Hi, on another thread a few days ago, you said you were considering voting Kendall as your second preference.
    I posted a response pointing out that she was probably the most pro-EU of all the candidates and referencing a couple of recent quotes from her on the subject.
    Given that opposition to the EU is your most important priority (judging by the name you post under), did you change your mind about second-preferencing Kendall?