48 comments on “England team leaving the stadium after losing to Uruguay

  1. Steve Kaczynski on said:

    At least one of them is a Swedish chef. How did he get on the England team?

  2. Marko on said:

    “At least one of them is a Swedish chef. How did he get on the England team?”

    I thought that was Roy Hodgson?

  3. Mark P on said:

    Name a single other country at World Cup 2014 without one player in their squad who plays in a league outside of his own country.

    Name a single player in the current England line up a top European club outside of England or Scotland would want to buy.

    Name a single other governing body in world sport that has less control over the elite level of its sport than the English FA

    Explains a lot really.

    Mark P

  4. Mark P,

    England looked very ordinary last night, apart from one or two flashes of brilliance from Sturridge. They were woefully disorganised at the back, lacked any fire in midfield, and were unable to take the chances they had up front. It pains me to say this but Gerrard for the first time in an England shirt looked a liability. He doesn’t have the defensive ability to play in that role and is apt to making mistakes in the one area of the pitch where it’s lethal. He cost Liverpool the title with a mistake and now it looks as though his mistake has ensured that England are going home early.

    Think of the huge resources these players have enjoyed going into the tournament – first class training facilities, nutrition, sports science, etc, and they put in a performance like that.

    You’re dead right, for all the Premiership is the most exciting domestic league in the world, in international tournaments England today aren’t a patch on the 1990 team.

  5. SteveH on said:

    “Name a single other governing body in world sport that has less control over the elite level of its sport than the English FA”

    All those who have their elite players playing in other parts of the world! Brazil play friendlies in London for f!*ks sake!

  6. Mark P on said:

    You can either have a boom n bust Premiership wholly run and owned as a private company, with Championship (sic) clubs desperate to be promoted into it.

    Or you can have the prospect of a successful England team.

    You can’t have both. The English FA are the architects of their own destruction.

    Meanwhile, c’mon Italy!

    Mark P

  7. Karl Stewart on said:

    In last night’s game, I think the problem was that we were foiled by their cunning tactic of getting their goalie to kick the ball high and almost the whole length of the pitch right over our players’ heads to their star striker.

    If we’re going to move forward as a footballing nation, we need to find ways of dealing with this kind of fancy foreign trickery.

  8. Feodor on said:

    Mark P: Name a single player in the current England line up a top European club outside of England or Scotland would want to buy.

    Rooney, and Rooney alone–thought he was England’s outstanding player last night, such a shame they don’t know how to use him properly, giving him freedom, getting him on the ball early and often and trying to dictate the game through him.

    John: errard for the first time in an England shirt looked a liability. He doesn’t have the defensive ability to play in that role and is apt to making mistakes in the one area of the pitch where it’s lethal.

    British football seems to have a real problem developing midfielders: by and large, they’re either wingers or box-to-box central midfielders. It’s probably a cultural thing–an over-reliance on physicality and direct football, with not enough emphasis on developing players tactically. This runs through the game at all levels. The result is England can’t even produce a Makélélé, never mind a Pirlo or Xavi, to play in a deep-lying role, nor an attacking midfielder with a bit of guile and creativity in the final third–Wilshere might of done that, however Hodgson doesn’t seem to rate him very highly.

    As for defenders, what do the Germans always say about English centre-halfs: big, strong, good in the air but thin between the ears, both Klose’s goal at the last world cup and Suarez’s goal last night were dreadful defensive lapses. You have to be positionally inept to get beaten by a long ball from the keeper. British centre-halfs are generally very poor with the ball at their feet, too, which again shows the damaging results of favouring physicality over technique.

    Lastly, what on earth makes Hodgson think the Danny Wellbeck’s and Rickie Lambert’s of this world are of international calibre? I’d rather not take a full quota of players than include those two! Jordan Henderson’s pretty average too, while the best passer of the ball England have produced in a generation, Carrick, sits at home with only 31 caps to his name.

    The British way of thinking about the beautiful game is decades behind the top footballing nations. England will continue to underperform at the highest level as long as this remains the case.

  9. Steve Kaczynski on said:

    Karl Stewart:
    In last night’s game, I think the problem was that we were foiled by their cunning tactic of getting their goalie to kick the ball high and almost the whole length of the pitch right over our players’ heads to their star striker.

    If we’re going to move forward as a footballing nation, we need to find ways of dealing with this kind of fancy foreign trickery.

    Possibly England just need to recruit Uruguayan goalies and offer British citizenship. Goalies who can kick a ball with that kind of long-distance accuracy are worth having.
    Or else field an entire team consisting of Swedish chefs. Their football might be lousy but the meatballs must be wonderful.

  10. Steve Kaczynski on said:

    They do seem unfazed by defeat, cheerfully cycling away. The trouble is that this just sets them up for future defeat.
    In the 18th century the Royal Navy shot Admiral Byng for a less than totally aggressive performance against the French in a naval battle. This led to Voltaire writing that the British found it a good idea to shoot an admiral once in a while pour encourager les autres. And by and large British admirals did take an aggressive approach to naval combat in future wars. Is this the secret? Are England teams simply not afraid of bloody reprisals for failure? Should they be?

  11. Steve Kaczynski on said:

    I was being a bit tongue in cheek, but at the same time I wonder whether these overpaid footballers do not give of their best because they have no fear of the consequences of failure?
    It wouldn’t just be official sanctions, either. Some countries’ football fans tend to be quite passionate about failure as well as success, to the point that poor performers may come home to something of a lynch mob atmosphere.

  12. Feodor on said:

    Steve Kaczynski:…I wonder whether these overpaid footballers do not give of their best because they have no fear of the consequences of failure?

    There were times in the game when it seemed like–Gerrard and Rooney excused–no one wanted to take responsibility, leaving someone else to mark a man or challenge for a header, and not showing for the ball, too. I don’t think it comes from a fear of failure, though. Rather, imo it seems more a case of what happens when the over-confident are found wanting and shrink into themselves. Filling their heads with talk of the Premier League as the best in the world–which it ain’t, with its players–even decidedly average ones–being treated as superstars, doesn’t help.

  13. Karl Stewart on said:

    Steve Kaczynski:
    …these overpaid footballers…

    This is a common refrain, but people never seem to accuse top-selling novelists, popular musicians, or celebrity actors of being “overpaid” do they?

    Why is this? All of the above would argue that they receive a lot of money because they generate a lot of revenue, but it’s only and solely footballers who are continuously referred to as being “overpaid”.

    Even among professional athletes, footballers are the only ones ever accused of being “overpaid” – we never hear it being said about tennis players do we?

    Is this because footballers are the only group who are all from working-class backgrounds? And are therefore considered “undeserving”?

  14. Jellytot on said:

    Karl Stewart: Is this because footballers are the only group who are all from working-class backgrounds? And are therefore considered “undeserving”?

    I think it’s exactly that.

  15. jim mclean on said:

    Should start again with a couple of friendlies to do some team building, the likes of Iceland one week, maybe Farmfoods the next. (posted by niece on facebook)

  16. Cailean on said:

    I don’t even begin to understand football and whats what in the world cup. But Muppets on bikes – whats not to like 🙂 ?!

  17. Ralph Blake on said:

    I always thought socialists called for the defeat of the England team as it was a set back for national chauvism and one nation England. Well done to the comrades iin the England football team. Lenin would have been proud of you. Never mind the nation can focus on Wimbkedon from Monday and back a real winner and champion. Oh I forgot Andy’s Scottish well he will be if he losses – British until that point.

  18. Steve Kaczynski on said:

    Karl Stewart: This is a common refrain, but people never seem to accuse top-selling novelists, popular musicians, or celebrity actors of being “overpaid” do they?

    Why is this? All of the above would argue that they receive a lot of money because they generate a lot of revenue, but it’s only and solely footballers who are continuously referred to as being “overpaid”.

    Even among professional athletes, footballers are the only ones ever accused of being “overpaid” – we never hear it being said about tennis players do we?

    Is this because footballers are the only group who are all from working-class backgrounds? And are therefore considered “undeserving”?

    I have on occasion noticed some performers being accused of being paid too much. Marlon Brando for one. Maybe it was because he had a reputation for relatively progressive politics that he was attacked, but he was prone to neglect learning his lines and have cue cards set up all over the place, in this case on Robert Duvall’s chest:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/19/photo-reveals-marlon-bran_n_2902771.html

  19. Vanya on said:

    #25 Presumably you would also ‘call for’ the defeat of Scotland were they in an international tournament for the same reason?

  20. Ralph Blake on said:

    Vanya:
    #25 Presumably you would also ‘call for’ the defeat of Scotland were they in an international tournament for the same reason?

    We also demonstrated international solidarity with oppressed Uruguay by physically supporting them in the stadium!

  21. Steve Kaczynski on said:

    I think it would be better to display solidarity with oppressed England by sacking the current team and finding some decent players.

  22. Marko on said:

    Seriously, does anyone in Scotland give a shit about Tennis or Andy Murray?

    England do have some good young players, though we need a genuine world class central midfielder and a centre half of the Ferdinand or Terry class.

  23. Vanya on said:

    #29 Nothing like displaying international solidarity in a football stadium in Latin America.

  24. Ralph Blake on said:

    Marko:
    Seriously, does anyone in Scotland give a shit about Tennis or Andy Murray?

    England do have some good young players, though we need a genuine world class central midfielder and a centre half of the Ferdinand or Terry class.

    Mass turnouts at big screens and pubs packed watching him on the telly when Andy plays .

  25. Karl Stewart on said:

    What do people think about having a ‘Team UK’ next time?

    We’d get to use Gareth Bale and Aaron Ramsey, and although I can’t think of any good Scottish or Northern Irish players at the moment, we could have Brendan Rogers or even Alex Ferguson as manager.

  26. Mark P: Name a single other country at World Cup 2014 without one player in their squad who plays in a league outside of his own country….Explains a lot really.Mark P

    Entertaining theory but one you’d you’d find difficult to defend. How many members of the Italian squad in the 2006 World Cup were playing in a league outside their own country? How did Italy do in that tournament?

  27. Karl Stewart: What do people think about having a ‘Team UK’ next time? We’d get to use Gareth Bale and Aaron Ramsey, and although I can’t think of any good Scottish or Northern Irish players at the moment, we could have Brendan Rogers or even Alex Ferguson as manager.

    Depends on who the “we” is. Some people would say “we’d get to use Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain and Theo Walcott”. Or are you basically thinking of Team UK as basically being England with some additional options for tinkering. On your other point, I suppose if there was a ‘Team North-West Europe” “we” could have had Sven-Goran Eriksson as manager.

  28. Karl Stewart on said:

    Zaid: Depends on who the “we” is. Some people would say “we’d get to use Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain and Theo Walcott”.

    The “we” would be England, Scotland, Wales & Northern Ireland (and yes of course Walcott and Oxlade-Chamberlain would be strong contenders – once they’ve recovered from injury.)

    Zaid:Or are you basically thinking of Team UK as basically being England with some additional options for tinkering.

    I’m thinking the best 11 players (plus subs) from across the four home nations. Selected by the manager on ability (if you’re implying a ‘quota’ system, I’m afraid I think that would be daft). We could play home games in each capital in turn – I think it’d be great.

    Zaid:I suppose if there was a ‘Team North-West Europe” “we” could have had Sven-Goran Eriksson as manager.

    I don’t get your point there Zaid – there isn’t a “North-west Europe” nation state, so that wouldn’t make any sense.

  29. Matty on said:

    “He cost Liverpool the title with a mistake”
    I know what you mean but that statement is a load of bollocks really. Leagues are won over 38 matches not one. For example, Gerrard’s pass for the winner against Fulham away was magnificent. Also, he scored 13 league goals. Liverpool’s jump from 7th to 2nd was one of the most refreshing things to have happened in league football for years.
    As for England, well there are lots of problems of course – lack of decent coaching at grass-roots level, lack of school sports, Roy Hodgson is hardly the most innovative coach, the greed is good Premier League etc. More recently, the cuts to council funding mean that rents for pitches have rocketed.

  30. jim mclean on said:

    Ralph Blake: We also demonstrated international solidarity with oppressed Uruguay by physically supporting them in the stadium!

    Reading the press the Scottish guy seemed genuine enough and has supported Uruguay long before they qualified for the world cup. A charity worker in Brazil he basically supplies young kids with football strips. Uruguay is probably the last socialist leaning nation in the World Cup, so yes, I will now support Uruguay until the end of their run as a token of solidarity with Comrade Mujica although their forward line will lack that certain snap.

  31. Vanya on said:

    #41 That was the point I was alluding to in #33.The proud history of Scotland taking a progressive stance in the world separate from the prison of the British state has never failed to impress me.

    Then again, one of the few times that Franco’s Guardia Civil were faced down successfully by a crowd of unarmed civilians it was by a bunch of huns in Barcelona 🙂

  32. jim mclean on said:

    Vanya,

    Yep I know at times the Scots seem to take a more progressive route but we could for example discuss the positive relationship between Ghandi and the English Working Classes.

  33. jim mclean on said:

    Vanya: Then again, one of the few times that Franco’s Guardia Civil were faced down successfully by a crowd of unarmed civilians it was by a bunch of huns

    Probably thought it was the Garda

  34. Zaid on said:

    Karl Stewart: I don’t get your point there Zaid – there isn’t a “North-west Europe” nation state, so that wouldn’t make any sense.

    Apologies if I didn’t make it clear but I will try again. Sven-Goran Eriksson used to be your national team’s manager (look it up if you don’t believe me). He is Swedish. There didn’t need to be a “Team North-West Europe” for that to happen. So why does there need to be a “Team UK” for your team to be managed by Brendan Rogers or Alex Ferguson?

  35. Vanya on said:

    #45 I got your point. It was more of your sledgebammer wit disrespecting the country you have chosen to live in. Apolitical and bad manners to boot. The world is a very big place you know.

  36. Karl Stewart on said:

    Zaid: why does there need to be a “Team UK” for your team to be managed by Brendan Rogers or Alex Ferguson?

    Because Brendan Rogers is Northern Irish and Alex Ferguson is Scottish, so it would be a good way to ensure all four of the home nations are involved.

  37. Feodor on said:

    Karl Stewart: Because Brendan Rogers is Northern Irish and Alex Ferguson is Scottish, so it would be a good way to ensure all four of the home nations are involved.

    Ouch!